Fashion, faces and the future

Last week I had the pleasure of meeting Professor Danka Tamburic, Professor in Cosmetic Science at the London College of Fashion because she is hosting a fascinating Symposium in April, Skin: The ultimate interface, to which I will be contributing with Henrietta Spalding. Our title is ‘Changing Faces: from stigma to face equality’.

The meeting was brought about through the good offices of my old friend, Emeritus Professor Terence Ryan. I met him more than twenty years ago when he was a professor at Oxford University and a highly-respected consultant dermatologist – and there we were discussing skin and the stigma of disfigurement in a fashion college! But no ordinary fashion college – one which has laboratories where students and researchers study the chemistry of skin creams and used to have the Rev Joanna Jepson as its first Rector of Fashion.

Joanna – with whom I have not always agreed! – has written a powerful book called Fashion, Faith and Fig-Leaves: a Memoir, in which she describes her journey in faith and how her rare facial condition affected so much of her adolescence. She became isolated and introverted – and then she risked major maxilla-facial surgery on her chin, teeth and mouth. Which, in her case, was transformational.

Henrietta has also written a brilliant book about her facial paralysis with Professor Jonathan Cole, a neurophysiologist, called The Invisible Smile about life with Moebius Syndrome. It’s a condition which no amount of surgery can change significantly.

It was 45 years on Friday since I looked in the mirror for the first time after fire had severely damaged my face. I knew in that mirror moment that I was a marked man – stigmatised by my scars and disfigurement. Five years of brilliant reconstructive surgery produced my unusual face as it is today. As good as it could get. Contrary to popular belief – myth – that’s it.

Last week too, I read a fascinating article about ‘How long until we can print human faces in the lab?’. The idea that your own stem cells could be used to manufacture a new face if your face is damaged as mine was is still decades away, I suspect, but it might be possible.

Until that happens and such treatment is widely available – and of course, it will not touch many other causes, like facial paralysis – we must tackle the stigma of disfigurement every day in every setting. That’s what Henrietta and I will be saying – and that’s what the campaign for face equality is all about. Join us!

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Faces of the First World War

This weekend, people up and down the country will be marking Remembrance Sunday and remembering the hundreds of thousands of people who died in conflict.

For me, it’s also an opportunity to reflect on the enormous advances in plastic and reconstructive surgery that resulted from the work of pioneering surgeons a hundred years ago – achievements currently being celebrated in a moving exhibition at the Hunterian Museum.

I’ve recorded this short film, explaining the advances and how they continue to be important even today.