Celebrating the springboard donation to Changing Faces

Greville and Lisa Mitchell

Greville and Lisa Mitchell

Twenty-five years ago this week, on Friday 25th October 1991, I received the very first donation to Changing Faces – and it was a full nine months before the charity was officially ‘launched’ and was therefore of even more significance.

So I was delighted last week to be invited to have coffee with Greville and Lisa Mitchell in their lovely house overlooking Perelle Bay in Guernsey – and to thank them yet again for their immense generosity. Their donation was the trigger, it gave me the confidence – and they didn’t stop there either!

Greville Mitchell is a very well-respected local philanthropist in Guernsey – he’d put up the initial funding for the island’s hospice. I didn’t know him but managed to get an introduction and met him one afternoon in early October 1991.

I explained what I was thinking of doing – creating a charity to fill the void in psycho-social, confidence-building care for people with disfigurements from any cause, to advocate that such care should be a routine of health care after burns, cleft lip and palate, facial cancer or paralysis or skin conditions, and to challenge the prevailing and pervasively negative public attitudes around disfigurement.

A big agenda, I admitted, but it need to be tackled. I asked him if he would advise me on whether he thought it a viable and worthwhile idea. He agreed to review my ‘business plan’ (I shuddered at its paucity) and said he would get back to me.

A few days later, I had just been out spreading slurry on a local field fully-clad in protective oil skins and stopped at the end of our farm track to rescue the post from the mail box. I climbed back into the tractor cab and opened one of the letters, the writing of which I didn’t recognise. It was from Greville: “thank you for your book and your plan… I think it is a very good and exciting idea and needs doing… and here’s £5,000 to get it going… and I’ll go on supporting you if you do get it up and running.”

And so the Andrew Mitchell Christian Charitable Trust became our very first donor – and Greville has been good to his word like the great Christian gentlemen he is. He has given 25 gifts to a total value of £146,000.

But that very first donation was the most important. From a complete outsider, he recognised the need I was talking about and was prepared to put money behind it. That is how charities like Changing Faces start and that is what keeps us going forward:

Because people believe as Greville did – and does – that it “needs doing”.

What is more, I could write to other prospective donors and say “I had already received substantial support”!

Greville and Lisa: you spring-boarded so much – mega thanks!

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Celebrating excellence in diversity practice

I was delighted to have been asked to speak and give the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Excellence in Diversity Awards in Leeds last week – what a great celebration it was!

I was honoured to speak at the Excellent in Diversity Awards last week

I was honoured to speak at the Excellent in Diversity Awards last week

Congratulations to everyone who was nominated – and the winners should be very proud… and especially to Karin Woodley, Chief Executive of Cambridge House who was given the Lifetime Achievement Award. I salute you!… and what a superb speech you made… “fighting for social justice is our moral obligation”…

Here’s what I said:

I am very pleased to hear that there have been so many excellent submissions for these Awards this year – and that the numbers are rising year on year. This message should go our loud and clear into our society which sadly, is too often characterised as narrow-minded and prejudiced. Not true. Respect, diversity and inclusion are thriving.

What tonight proves is that many many companies and organisations ‘get it’ – they understand the argument that diversity is good for their organisations and good for business – and they want to tap into the strength of the diversity of our society.

At the risk of preaching to the converted, let’s just revisit why investing in diversity can give organisations and companies a competitive edge and bottom-line advantage… three simple reasons:

  • because they can attract the most talented people to work for them
  • because they can retain staff who go through life-changing experiences
  • because they can attract customers who might not shop with them.

Simples.

I am glad to say that Changing Faces has worked with many companies across the UK to help them embed respect for ‘face equality’ and so enable them to attract people with unusual faces into their workplace, retain them if they go through a difficult experience – like a facial cancer or a Bell’s palsy – and ensure that people like me get excellent customer service… and aren’t asked ‘Cor, what happened to you?’ at the check-out desk. Yes it happens.

But we also run into the usual excuses – ‘we are dealing with gender equality this year’ and ‘we are fully trained on disability so don’t worry’. Sadly, it is often not until one of our users reports a bad incident that companies are impelled to do something.

Similarly, in 15 years of Dining with a Difference events, I have been amazed at how the top Boards of big companies frequently do not ‘get it’… They fail to see that disability, disfigurement and diversity are important strategic business issues not just annoying HR problems. Dining has lots of light-bulb moments for them…

I think there is one factor that marks out organisations and companies that ‘get it’ and those that don’t – they have a champion in a senior or high-level position who gets it and is determined to embed ‘it’ into the very fabric of the organisation.

A classic example was a major bank for which we ran a Dining event… we were told that many of the top Board were coming and were tasked with getting one of them as champion… at the end of the evening, the Finance Director got up to say ‘thank you’ and completely unprompted, announced that he’d put his hand up to be the company’s Disability Champion.

He kept his word and went on to become the Chief Executive. The whole company’s approach to disability – and diversity across the board too – changed.

So my message to you this evening is actually a challenge: I task you all with finding and nurturing the next generation of champions on diversity and inclusion in your organisations to take the embedding up to the next level.

Doing good

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L-R Jayne Woodley of Oxfordshire Community Foundation, James Partridge, John Nickson

A great evening at the Oxford Union last week! So fascinating to be part of an ancient debating tradition that goes back to Gladstone who was President of the Union in 1830. I stood at the despatch box – opposing the motion – on the same boards as many giants of the political world and wider society of the past 185 years.

It was all done in a very formal process conducted under the watchful eye of Charles Vaughan, the President of the Oxford Union in his white tie and tails.

Those supporting the motion, James Bevan of CCLA, Nigel Mercer, President of the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons and Sali Hughes, beauty writer and columnist constructed some formidable arguments to support the spending of money on ‘looking good’.

It has economic value, of course – providing employment for millions of people and much scope for charitable giving to medical research and other good causes. And no-one could dispute that the skills of plastic surgeons can improve a person’s looks… and I, for one, do not object to that provided the patient – or customer – has been given realistic information about the risks and benefits and has been told of other ways of gaining self-esteem.

The debate was really about the balance of society’s spending as Professor Danny Dorling and John Nickson and I tried to explain – and with the certainty that the state will be withdrawing from many areas of civil society in the years ahead, there is a real and urgent need to re-balance our priorities towards ‘doing good’.

There were many examples of how that spending could make a difference – but my one regret is that the nine-minute rule for all speakers prevented us elaborating on why such spending, giving or volunteering can make such a difference.

I am immensely proud of the work of Changing Faces’ staff, volunteers, ambassadors and many other people who have been transforming the lives and future prospects of anyone who experiences a disfigurement as I did years ago from severe burns at the age of 18 – and you can read about most significant impact in the last year on our website. My next blog will cover what we are seeking philanthropy for.

Lastly, a big thank you to my supporters for coming and cheering – and to the Oxfordshire Community Foundation for organising such a treat!

More tax or more philanthropy in 2011?

Happy New Year – and what a dismal year in prospect for not-for-profits like Changing Faces if you listen to some doom-mongers, full of uncertainty, austerity and the d-word itself, deficit reduction. Sir Stephen Bubb, CEO of ACEVO, weighed in early with a broadside arguing that Government should raise billions of pounds from a tax on bank bonuses which would then go into the putative Big Society Bank to be set up by the Coalition to encourage social enterprise – http://tinyurl.com/2ae7mpv

Reporting this, The Guardian quotes the charity thinktank New Philanthropy Capital as suggesting that more than a quarter of charities which receive state cash expect to make staff redundant and estimated that the voluntary sector’s income from state sources could shrink by between £3bn and £5bn as a result of the cuts.

Let’s not underestimate this – the speed of the austerity bite and the ghastly uncertainty being experienced by many in the Third Sector make the whole project called ‘big society’ so much more difficult because the very local projects which it is designed to spawn are being shaken to the core – a tsunami hits very quickly and leaves devastation behind.

But is more Government funding the answer? For most charities, though perhaps not for some of the social enterprises that will be challenged by the fall-away in local contracts, it is the future of that wonderful thing ‘philanthropy’ that is at stake in 2011. Will those many millions of individuals who give to charity each year or the thousands of charitable trusts whose careful management of assets secures their income, or the many corporate entities that recognise their corporate citizenship role cut back on their generosity?

Whilst I understand Bubb’s desire to tax what might be perceived as ill-gotten or lucky gains (but are incentives to hard work in others’ eyes), I think much more effort should be concentrated on encouraging giving in all its forms. We need LOTS more public examples of how people have given and the impact it has made – not just at Marathon or Children in Need moments. And how about far better tax incentives to give for those who do win/earn those massive bonuses?

I am not persuaded by the proposed ‘give cash to charity’ message at cash machines but apparently it has worked in other European countries. The best thing I’ve seen recently – and I encourage you to do this – is the Give as You Live project. Here’s the pitch:

 Give as You Live works whenever you shop online – as many of us do now for all sorts of things including books (me!), airfares, insurance etc. Apparently, the average spend online is £3,000 pa! It is potentially worth an additional £75 per supporter to Changing Faces because it taps into what are called ‘the affiliate marketing budgets’ of major retailers and makes small %ages of the price paid by consumers available to charities.

As the spiel puts it: “you pay the same price for the same products from your favourite websites, without compromise in your online shopping habits, but in the process, raise money for Changing Faces – or any other cause you want to choose, of course. It’s shopping, but better.”

Here’s how to do it:

Step 1: Using Internet Explorer, download and install our free shopping App and select Changing Faces (or another charity) as your chosen cause. Get the App from http://www.giveasyoulive.com and more information too

Step 2: Shop online from over 1,000 participating stores

Step 3: Every purchase you make will raise extra funds for Changing Faces or your chosen cause

Over to you, please!